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president morsi granted himself unchecked powers and sent thousands of protesters back into the streets, people who had been helping to topple mubarak, now against the man they call the new egypt egyptian pharaoh. what are the chances we're headed for a new islamist coo in egypt? >> it could be headed that way. you could also be headed back to a military takeover. if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there's continued chaos. i'll never forget after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square. a young woman said it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that's what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power
and morsi. two pragmatists trying to find a way to mediate this immediate conflict. you see it against the backdrop of an islamist backdrop of turkey and the riots in jordan that will cause increasing problems. you have that changing environment which you know more about. the arabs need something different. the governments need to be more responsive to their people. it's an opening for a different relationship. no american president is going to criticize, i would argue, israel's launching of this war. it is an opening for our relationship with egypt, turkey, to implement a cease-fire to monitor gaza and israel's relationship, but overarching all of it, it's a painful issue to discuss. anything we say on this show is going to be criticized. >> you think? >> i think. it's a history. going back to at least '67, the united states role as the enabler, as the political diplomatic economic enabler that in many ways, in a younger generation is seeing israelis that is not in the long term benefit of the security of the country. i make one last point. i urge your viewers to try to watch an israe
erupting in egypt after president muhammad morsi grants himself new and far-reaching powers. live pictures as the president speaking right now. that's muhammad morsi, as hundreds of egyptians are protesting in tahrir square today. morsi's opponents clashing with supporters in cities all over egypt. we're now hearing protesters storming the office of the muslim brotherhood and throwing out books and chairs and other things onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the ne
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
egyptian president morsi for his role in brokering the cease-fire. the morrissey -- morsi government acts as a go teen for hamas which the u.n. does not negotiate. secretary of state, hillary clinton emergency peacemaking mission was after a week fighting that killed 180 palestinians and five israelis. the chief correspondent, jonathan hunt sex like at the united nations. secretary clinton made the point this is really just one step in a long process. >>jonathan: bringing a halt to the firing of rockets by hamas and by israel is obviously a crucial step but it is just a step and very much the first step. what we have seen today is an agreement for a quite literal ceasing of fire, none of the underlying issues has yet been tackled as hillary clinton made clear today in her comments. listen. >> the united states will work with partners to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >>jonathan: on the part of the palestinians, what they want is lifting of the economic blockade on gaza, the israels have indicated they will a
: president mohamed morsi, gave himself almost unchecked powers and sent thousands into the streets, the people who have been helping to topple hosni mubarak, now, who they are calling the new egyptian pharaoh. are we headed for a you new islamist coup and islamist state in egypt. >> it could be headed that way and also could be headed back to a military takeover, if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there is continued chaos. i'll never forget, chris, after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square, and, a young woman said, senator mccain it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that is what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience in the 1970s, and -- but, what should the u.s. be doing, saying, this is unacceptable and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you p
power grab by their democratic leader. earlier we saw violent clashes as president mohammed morsi said the far reaching powers he just granted himself, basically saying he can ignore the courts are just temporary. the thousands gathered in the streets of kaj roar not so sure. they are making their doubts known with a round of protests this afternoon. coming up we will speak with ralph peters about what happened to the promise of democracy in this country and what the rice of a powerful group of islamic hard liners means to america. ralph says the future of egypt is literally on the line today. there was also some breaking news a couple of hours ago in the fast and furious investigation, that's the gun-running sting operation gone bad. and then the probe that led to a multiyear knock down drag out fight between congress and the department of justice, the one wanting the documents and the facts, and the department of justice not wanting to turn it all over. you may remember that attorney general eric holder was sued for more documents on the program that wound up funneling thousands of w
of egypt's muslim brotherhood. the party of egyptian president mohammed morsi as he agrees to new talks about over his controversial decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. steve harrigan is streaming live from care row. what can you tell us. >> details of the offices of the muslim brotherhood. attack happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waitin
in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and they ended up with this muslim brotherhood path mohamed morsi. what are the charges he's interested in compromise? >> reporter: he has shown no signs of making a concession. the opposition says they will stay put in tahrir square. they say they won't negotiate until the president makes a complete stepdown.
in the growing outrage over the president morsi's takeover. last week, the president from the muslim brotherhood issued several decrees including an order that every decision he makes is a final decision, no review. critics say he appointed himself as a dictator two years after a massive popular uprising ousted mubarak. our eyes and ears on the ground, these are the latest crowds you have seen in tahrir square, right, steve? >> the five days since the decree we wondered if the protests would get bigger or smaller. they are growing larger and more angry. the crowd today well over 100,000 people in tahrir square, and from different walks of life, different political stories. the opposition to the president has been unified by his decree expanding his own power. so we have people on want the old days of mubarak. you have liberals. nationalists. they are all angry at an overstepping by this president and they all coming out to the square. this is the way they are trying to use their leverage against the president. the chant are the same "this regime must leave." >>shepard: disturbing to hear your re
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been ref
with egyptian president morsi in cairo right now just hours after the bombing of an israeli passenger bus. secretary clinton issued this statement on the bombing -- "the united states strongly condemns this terrorist attack and our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and the people of israel." let me bring in congressman steve israel, a democrat from new york, and chair of the democratic congressional campaign committee. congressman, good morning. >> good morning, chris. >> u.n. representative cole sent a letter to president morsi asking him to refrain from giving hamas cover to intensify its attacks by allowing egyptian delegations to visit gaza. of course, morsi has been a major player in these truce negotiations. do you think he's sending a mixed message? >> well, he is sending a mixed message. you know, i hope that president morsi is able to play a constructive role. but when high-level delegations of egyptians go into gaza under the pretense of a cease-fire and then terrorist groups violate that cease fire, if israel were to defend itself and members of the delegation was tragi
? the president mohammed morsi knows that this is happening? >> i will put it this way. the weaponry goes to the red sea from iran. they also come from libya and at certain points, they all cost to egyptian territory. certainly, there is a responsibility to step up to the plate and stop the smuggling. egypt has been constructed from the past. we hope they will continue to fulfill this role now in the future. jenna: i ask that question because we know how important this relationship is for your country and all of ours. i want to talk about "the new york times" article that he wrote about today. it was published and he said that hamas is not interested in peace. they want violence and they want to promote terror. it is not a rational thing according to the way that you laid this out. why negotiate at all through any here in this region? >> they don't want to negotiate at all, they don't want to speak with us. they want to destroy us. they don't actually want to just kill israelis, but jews throughout the world. they are a genocide organization. but they can negotiate with egypt and others w
is holding up. >> live in jerusalem, interesting to see president morsi with a power grab on thursday as well. good morning to you, hope you had a good thanksgiving, leland . >> we did on the israel/gaza border and back in jerusalem monitoring the situation. the map of the middle east is changing as president morsi is grabbing more power and his international pres tig is going up after putting himself center stage for israel and hamas. not only prime minister netanyahu and president obama in the united states and secretary secretary clinton who praised him for becoming part of the deal. not everyone in egypt is happy with president morsi. including him grack the power and putting himself above the judiciary among other things is protest in egypt about that not only for the muslim brotherhood but also against him and the muslim brotherhood of the party and now president morsi came out against the treaties with israel and hamas and saying that they need tod continue the islamic jihad movement in order to liberate all occupied territors of israel. things are remarkably calm 41 hours in the cease
asking you about what's going on in egypt right now where muhammad morsi must feel pretty emboldened after playing such a crucial role in helping to broker a ceasefire between's reel and hamas. -- between israel and hamas. he is now sort of changing the law of the land, a power grab. how's this going to work out? is. >> well, i think he's revealed his true stripes. this is not democracy in action, this is a classic effort at one person, one vote, one time. he's, obviously, met resistance. let's hope it's successful. but i think it's just highly ironic that after dozens of commentators left and right in this country hailed muhammad morsi for his responsible conduct with respect to gaza and how he wasn't acting like an an extremist from the muslim brotherhood got what he, got what he needed from the ceasefire agreement and immediately began acting like an extremist from the muslim brotherhood. that should be what we focus on going forward. and for anybody who thinks the ceasefire in gaza is durable, all they had to do was read these headlines about what morsi did in egypt the day after
of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormously influential nation where people forced out of dictator last year again threatens to fall into chaos and inst
is in cairo tonight. >> attempts by egypt president morsi to expand his powers have galvanized the oppositio opposition. in to the largest street protest since those that helped overthrow the former president hosni mubarak two years ago. >> the protesters are a mix. young and old. secular and nationalists. joined for the moment by one emotion. anger. the egypt's first democratically elected president overstepped the bounds and trying to become exactly what they fought so hard to get rid of. a dictator. >> they are great control. appreciate the culture in their own image of muslim brothers. they are not hiding it. it's not that. they are doing it, secretly. >> mohammed morsi's attempt at compromise meeting with the chief judges in cairo, giving verbal assurances that the sweeping powers would only be temporary and limited to unspecified sovereign matters has done nothing to stem unrest. schools and many businesses were closed today due to demonstrations. planned march by muslim brotherhood in support of mohammed morsi was canceled to reduce the chance of conflict between the two sides. >> opp
thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable and the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward demaddress which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> brian: joining us is the navy commander from the office of secretary of defense under george bush. he is jd gordon. is it up to the president to get more involved to tell morsi to stop with the absolute monarch thing. >> i think the president should stand up to the muslim brotherhood and say we will not send aid dollars to egypt. morsi put himself [pwao-fr] the courts and law. it is one dick traitorship replaced by another. we need to get tough on egypt. >> steve: when the arab spring first started people were optmistic and it is not turning out the way we hoped it would. >> no, in 2010 the survey poll in egypt found that 17 percent of the egyptians were favorable to the united states and 24 percent favorable to al-qaida and 60 percent to the isla
's for this man, president mohammed morsi whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. it has led to days of bloody clashes. the crowed is chanting erhal, or leave. these are many of the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they've substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, the dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held an historic election and voted in a new president. >> he's like a pharaoh. >> reporter: morsi's office says it is temporary to put egypt on the right track. tonight the wise voices say it's far from fear that will win the showdown, but there are certainly more bloody days ahead on egypt's bumpy road to democracy. alex marquardt, abc news, cairo. >>> and back here at home we want to tell you about another food alert out tonight and this one is about pork. a big consumer report study found a high rate of contamination in pork chops and ground pork from a kind of bacteria that can send you to the emergency room. abc's dr. richard besser brings us the whole picture. >> reporter: you don't know its name,
is a tinderbox as protests grow against president mohamed morsi. more than 200,000 people jammed the square to protest morsi's layton power grab last week. the crowd chanting for morsi to leave, echoing the call from the revolution that tossed hosni mubarak. >>> an investigation has revealed that the factory made clothes for walmart, sears and our parent company, disney. and there have been three factory officials suspected of locking the doors, dooming those workers inside. 112 people died in the fire. >>> the tampa socialite caught up in the petraeus sex scandal is now fighting back. attorneys for jill kelley are going after a new york man, who claimed kelley tried to use her connection to petraeus to broker a deal. this morning's "new york times" reports the investigation into e-mails between kelley and general john allen, are only about 70 messages of the thousands the 2 exchanged. >>> bob dole is expected to be released from a washington area hospital this morning, after undergoing a routine procedure. dole ran for president against bill clinton back in 1996. >>> people of northern cal
in this, president morsi's role was really a wonderful sight for the future, it tells us that the muslim brotherhood who control egypt are going to be a major force throughout the region are going to be moderates and are going to try to -- >> with a price. >> that's real concern. to follow-up on something that joe said, everyone is happy that there was a cease-fire. but i think, actually, the wrong lessons are going to be learned by both sides. what's going to eand up in this process, israelis now want a military conflict and the palestinians who want to confront israel, they'll be emboldened for different reasons. the big problem is, fear exists on both sides. i wrote about this this week as well as the fiscal cliff. i don't think either side can see a future where conflict doesn't exist. the conflict has now given their lives meaning. if they take away the conflict, israel doesn't have a meaning. and the palestinians don't have a meaning. >> i feel some people actually started to see what was going on in the past week, in the middle east and started to actually turn away, thinking, not
will head to cairo where she'll have face-to-face meetings with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> want to begin with reza sayah, live for us in cairo. she mentioned in her comments that she is on her way to have meetings with the egyptian president, morsi, at the same time, offering any assistance that israel might need. tell me a little bit about the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israe
is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly sporting hamas, but at the same time brokering a deal. part of the motivation is the relationship with the united states, the aid that he receives from us on a regular basis -- gregg: 3.5 billion a year -- 1.5 billion a year. >> and i think a lot the criticism will be sub sued. gregg: money often talks in that part of the world. egypt claims it has intercepted and stopped truckloads of missile warheads headed for gaza. is that a single sl jewish tear gesture or the real deal? >> they probably have, but this is the toughest part of the
gotten the basic answers. >>> protesters demand an end to mohamed morsi's seizure of absolute power. >>> american civil liberties union is suing the pentagon to remove all restrictions on women in battle, calling the current strate strategy discriminatory. >> you're one of 12 kids, is that right? >> i'm one of 11 kids. >> well, you're probably catholic, right? we're just hillbillys. >>> reportedly lost his job over the map app. >>> premiere of "the hobbit" is getting under way. new z new zealand has unveiled a hobbit-themed airplane. of course, real hobbit fans only fly virgin. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we're in washington where lawmakers have just 34 days left to reach a deal before the a potentiaff deadline. that ning funded by cbs confidence is slowly starting to fade away and major is with us >>> major garret is with us in the studio. what's happening? >> americans might say, look, it feels like time is running out. they would be correct. nal republicwhite house and ote mostional republicans say they'll devote most if not all of this week, and things are slowing down an
're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basicall
for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, secularists, moderates. all have banded together in a show of force, in a show of opposition, against mr. morsi. of course, all of these protests started last thursday when he announced these particular decrees.
opposition rally against president morsi there. escalating violence is spreading across the city and much of egypt really for the last five days ever since the president's controversial decree granting himself nearance sew lieutenant power. that is a move many critics say is veiled attempt to turn egypt back into dictatorship. others say morsi is attempting to clean out the old guard and reaffirm a brand new move to a new government in egypt. something we're watching closely in the middle east. with pressure growing last night, morsi sat down last night with a five-hour meeting with the country's senior judges in an attempt he says to diffuse the situation but refused calls to withdraw the decree. >>> there is new push on capitol hill to stop the environmental protection agency from moving forward with a plan to impose stricter oil and gas regulations which opponents say will only cause more pain at the pump and drive a gal ghoul lon of regular -- gallon of regular gasoline higher than what you see on the screen. peter barnes is with us with more on this. this isn't just about gas prices.
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting
. protesters in egypt staged nationwide rallies today against egyptian president mohamed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in cairo, more than 100,000 people filled tahrir square to condemn morsi's decree that makes his decisions immune to judicial review. earlier, there were clashes between protesters and police. the rallies were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed ya
reporting from the front lines. protesters took to the streets of cairo today after mohamed morsi basically stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping presidential powers and eliminate the judiciary. demonstrators called on morsi to roll back his decree or resign. at least one person died in clashes with police. demonstrators stormed the headquarters of a party backed by morsi's muslim brotherhood. a spokesman said the building was destroyed, dozens of injuries. >>> 213-foot crane caught fire, it partially collapsed. this was on to a university building in sidney today. the crane was carrying 264 gallons of diesel fuel, flames went 32 feet into the air. no one was injured according to the operator lend lease. i wanted to mention that name because it might sound familiar. it is the same company that operated the crane that partially collapsed in new york city during superstorm sandy. the company is still in the process of reviewing that incident. >>> well, for the first time since his arrest two years ago, bradley manning is expected to take the stand in a pretrial hearing this week. no
jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculated. he thought in the aftermath of brokering a ceasefire between israel and hamas, that gave him a new standing internationally, gave him new stature in the region, and it did and he could somehow use that to convert it into new power within egypt himself. what he's finding is in fact the new egypt is an eg
, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in order that people's voices would be heard and reckoned with and they are angry that his camp is in a very brazen way trying to silence that. morsi's decrees, they say, feel they are a sign of times to come. it r will it be secular or islamic? they fear it's heading towards theorocracy like iran. >> are people harp pending back to mubarak days when things lasted, i don't know, three decades? >> look it, people have known in this country they've known power grabs, military coos, assassinations and nothing but that. so, of course, that's the baseline that they go on. there's a real fear amongst all of those people who are not muslim brotherhood that morsi is going to use their power, at least some would suggest paranoid about it, they are
protests in cairo against president morsi and his decree granting himself nearly absolute power. more than 200,000 people packed tahrir square. >>> four female soldiers who served tours in afghanistan filed a federal lawsuit yesterday trying to force the pentagon to he said a ban on women serving in combat jobs. the suit says service women have often found themselves in combat without receiving the same rewards or opportunities for promotion. >>> a federal judge is ordering bringing tobacco countries to run ads saying they deliberately deceived the public about the health effects of smoking. appeals are expected. >>> and the kate middleton opened a new gallery while debuting a new face framing hair do. layers there. maybe a little lighter, too. her royal highness got up close and personal with rare first editions of on the origin of species and birds of america. >>> and now here is your first look at this morning's dish of scrambled politics. the "chicago sun-times" reports former illinois congressman jesse jackson jr. may have been tipped off about the federal probe into his use of campai
questions that need answers. abc news, washington. >> a simmering protest against mohammed morsi's power grab erupted violence today in tahrir square. one demonstrateor reportedly killed by a canister during a running street battle. 100,000 egyptians are protesting against the debris -- decree granting morsi absolute control of the country. demonstrators are afraid it will lead to a dictatorship. >> officials took samples from yas yas yas's body. his widow requested on whether he was killed by israeli agents using a radio active poison a charge israel denied. yair fat was 75 years old when he died eight years ago. >> the bangladesh called a factory fire that killed 111 garment workers the work of an arsonist, labeling it sabotage but they're not releasing anymore information about a motive. closings dr dr clothing from the western states are made there. protestors marched through the streets. >> a bold move by fda shut down the biggest organic peanut butter plant in the country. we told you with this yesterday at 4:00. today, more about what fda inspectors found inside of that facility.
mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days
might be a new solution, and that is muhammad morsi, the egyptian president, why he took unexpected action yesterday and last week. but yesterday senator, democrat senator carl levin suggested that the biggest challenge is bringing muhammad morsi to the west's side. and perhaps that is something that has to to be looked into. what do you see, how do you see this might work and what the west can do with regards to egypt? >> well, that's a big question. i have actually written about egypt's nuclear weapons program, they had a weapons program under nasser, so it's a question i spent time in, not in a while. you know, i hope that -- this is a question that comes at a point of great confusion and no clarity about the future of egypt, is are morsi's decrees a power grab or a temporary set of arrangements to help a husband or nurture an egypt pollty that becomes democratic and strong and more legitimate? because mubarak was not he psychiatry mate at the end. i hope that it is a strong democrat, that egypt returns to it rightful place as the leader of the arab world, as the most popular cou
. >> white house criticizing president morsi. would you say that was incorrect statement? >> i would say that we are concerned about it and raised those concerns are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may
square is a tinderbox as protests against president morsi continue to grow. more than 200,000 people jammed the square to demonstrate against morsi's brazen power grab. tensions are growing across egypt, and alex marquadt reports now from cairo. >> reporter: the birthplace of egypt's revolution once again ringing with calls for the downfall of a dictator. this time it's for this man, president mohamed morsi, whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. last week he granted himself unchecked power, leading to today's bloody clashes. the crowd is chanting the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they have substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, a dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held a historic election, voted in the new president, and now -- >> he's like a pharoah. >> reporter: morsi's office says the move is just temporary, to sideline remnants of the mubarak era and put egypt on the right track. the wise voices say it is far from clear who will win the showdown. but there are certainly more bl
-year-old activist, and to voice their opposition to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. this ireport showing protesters as they carried the teenager's casket through tahrir square to a cemetery. morsi declared the court cannot overturn decisions he has made since coming into office in june. one opponent says it can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi insists that he is trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring, revolution, not accumulate unchecked power. >>> and if you're traveling through the northeast today, well, you might be dealing with a little bit of snow. meteorologist alexandra steele is in for rob marciano today. what are we looking at, alexandra? >> hey, good morning to you guys. yeah, we are seeing snow, even in new york city. all the big cities, boston, new york, philadelphia, a little snow. not much in the way of accumulation, really along the big cities and the 95 corridor, but still you'll see it come down. kind of get new the christmas spirit. we do have winter weather advisories and we will see accumulati accumulations. want to show you where. here'
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